Venue Details

170 Star Starred
The Marsh Berkeley
Between Shattuck and Oxford 2120 Allston Way Berkeley, CA 94704
415-641-0235
Venue website Get directions
Monica n.
Every seat is best seat.
Cops and Robbers info Aug 26 2014 star this tip starred
Monica n.
1/2 block from BART.
Cops and Robbers travel Aug 26 2014 star this tip starred
View All 358 Tips

Reviews & Ratings

493 ratings
4.7 average rating
  • 398
    5
  • 76
    4
  • 7
    3
  • 7
    2
  • 4
    1
47 events
29 reviews
29 stars
attended Mar 21 2010

I have seen this ABSOLUTELY FANTASTIC show more times than I care to mention. Don Reed is an amazingly talented storyteller, comedian, dancer, and actor. You WILL laugh until your jaw hurts (trust me). We are so fortunate to have such a rich...continued

star this review starred report as inappropriate
22 events
14 reviews
40 stars
attended Oct 09 2010

Okay, I am probably going to write the longest review known to Don Reed, but here it is:

5 stars are not enough. I love live theatre. I am avid about the performing arts but this took me to a personal space.
First of all, I grew up in Idaho...continued

star this review starred report as inappropriate
51 events
22 reviews
9 stars
attended Jan 23 2010

Don Reed's energy, enthusiasm and strong voice tell an amazing tale so well that you will not want to leave the theater! He is a joy to watch.

star this review starred report as inappropriate
View All 391 Reviews
Member Photos
My pic Don reed 8 Doris mae
More Information

Quotes & Highlights

East 14th comes to Berkeley following a long run at the Marsh San Francisco, where it won Goldstar’s Roar of the Crowd award.

Description

The Marsh, a breeding ground for new performance, is pleased to present Don Reed’s East 14th: Tales of a Reluctant Player. In the spirit of John Leguizamo’s “Freak.” Sarah Jones “Bridge And Tunnel” and Whoopi Goldberg’s “Whoopi,” comes this hilarious solo show chronicling the true tale of a young man raised by his mother and ultra-strict step-father as a middle class, straight A, God-fearing church boy. The boy, however, wanted to be just like his dear old Dad. Too bad he didn’t know dear old Dad was a pimp.  Very funny, definitely poignant – a ride down a street you won’t soon forget.

The play is set in Oakland, CA in the 1970’s. Reed’s father was super talented, cool as hell and very funny.  He would say the most outrageous stuff, whether it was sexually charged or just a good old fashioned diss.  He played the congos and was offered to travel with well-known bands. But he had never learned to read and felt he might be required to interpret a hotel bill or something – thus risking his “cool.”  So he let his dream pass. And for a while – got caught up in “The Life.”

He had three sons. Darrell was really focused on digging women. He LOVED women. ALL of them, and he became a beautician – a very good one – so he could be around them all the time. “You know somethin’ – every guy doin’ hair in that shop is gay” he used to say. Then he smiled like a wolf in a hen house and said, “But, I’m not.” Although a womanizer, he was deeply generous. Darrell would literally give anyone in need his very last dollar.  His other brother, Tony, was a study in effeminate elegance and assassin level self-defense. Tony could whoop ANYBODY in the neighborhood and accordingly stomped the stereotype of “the weak gay man” to bits. 

Reed himself was called Blinky because he had the habit of blinking his eyes. He remembers doing it on the bus ride all the way over to visit his father on Sundays. Sometimes his father wouldn’t be there – but he’d leave the door unlocked and Reed would get one of Darrell’s jackets out of the closet. Then he’d walk to the corner store, get a pint of Carnation Strawberry Ice Cream and coolly walk “The Stroll,” pretending to be older. And the street walkers would ask, “Why you blinkin’ like that?” then interject —“Wanna date baby?”  And he’d say, after taking a spoonful of the delicious strawberry magic: “I could buy some if I wanted to – but I don’t want to.” _

East 14th: Tales of a Reluctant Player _ran the entire summer of 2008 off-Broadway in New York City. It was a double nominee – Best Actor and Best Playwright — for the 2008 NAACP Theatre Awards — as well as a nominee for 2008 Best Solo Performance for the Audelco “Viv” Awards.