Venue Details

169 Star Starred
The Marsh Berkeley
Between Shattuck and Oxford 2120 Allston Way Berkeley, CA 94704
415-641-0235
Venue website Get directions
Susan Forster
Plan to look for parking
info Apr 26 2010 star this tip starred
Renee S.
Casual
info Jan 24 2011 star this tip starred
Renee S.
BART very near. Parking garage for under $6 within 2 blocks.
info Jan 24 2011 star this tip starred
Renee S.
No intermission, just brief breaks to set up next segment
info Jan 24 2011 star this tip starred
Goldstar Member
Snacks and coffee $1 each
info Jan 23 2012 star this tip starred
Bobbie Steinhart
Berkeley casual
info Jul 16 2012 star this tip starred
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Website

http://www.themarsh.org/philosophy_talk.html

Quotes & Highlights

Philosophy Talk is as accessible as it is thoughtful.” —_Los Angeles Times _
Philosophy Talk could teach British broadcasting a thing or two about quality intellectual debate… one of the great joys of American radio. It’s radio that knows how to talk.” —_The Guardian _(London)

Description

*February 16, 2014 at noon: Science and Gender With Londa Schiebinger *

What does gender have to do with science? The obvious answer is ‘nothing.’ Science is the epitome of an objective, rational, and disinterested enterprise. But given the history of systemic under-representation of women in science, what does it mean that science answers almost exclusively to the methodologies of men? Has male domination contributed certain unfounded assumptions or cognitive biases to the ‘objectivity’ of scientific inquiry? Is there any possibility of achieving a gender-neutral science, and if so, what would that look like? John and Ken make room at the table for Stanford historian Londa Schiebinger, author of Nature’s Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science.

*February 16, 2014 at 3:00pm: Risky Business: The Business of Risk With Lara Buchak *

There is an element of risk — either to ourselves or to others — in almost everything we do. By deciding to go to the grocery store, for example, we take a (very small) risk of getting into a car accident. Many risks are acceptable, of course, but how do we know when a risk is worth taking? The most important decisions, after all, are often risky ones. What about risks to others’ welfare? How do we, and should we, take risk into account when we make decisions? John and Ken take their chances with Lara Buchak from UC Berkeley, author of _Risk and Rationality. _