Venue Details

170 Star Starred
The Marsh Berkeley
Between Shattuck and Oxford 2120 Allston Way Berkeley, CA 94704
415-641-0235
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1/2 block from BART.
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Reviews & Ratings

18 ratings
4.1 average rating
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554 events
228 reviews
-6 stars
attended Jan 27 2013

Subject was intriguing. The discussion was a bit pedantic and got mired down in terminology rather than theory.

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196 events
188 reviews
86 stars
attended Jan 23 2011

We enjoyed the live (being taped) radio show, found the material "Extended Mind" interesting, and the guest well spoken. Ian's one minute philosopher and his 2 short stories were very engaging and witty. We've listened to the Philosophy Talk...continued

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5 events
3 reviews
4 stars
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More Information

Website

http://www.themarsh.org/philosophy_talk.html

Quotes & Highlights

  • Philosophy Talk is as accessible as it is thoughtful. — Los Angeles Times
  • Philosophy Talk could teach British broadcasting a thing or two about quality intellectual debate … one of the great joys of American radio. — The Guardian (London)

Description

June 22, 2014 at noon: Second-Guessing Ourselves With Sherri Roush
We like to think of ourselves as self-aware, reflective beings, but psychological studies demonstrate that we’re usually overconfident in the accuracy of our own beliefs. Memory, for example, can be extremely unreliable, even when we feel certain we know what happened. Surprisingly, when we’re made aware of this, we adjust our level of confidence in ourselves only slightly. How, then, can we doubt ourselves in a rational and efficient manner to bring our beliefs closer to reality? And, just as importantly, how do we prevent ourselves from falling into the other extreme of constant second-guessing? John and Ken think twice with Sherri Roush from UC Berkeley, author of “Second-Guessing: A Self-Help Manual.”

June 22, 2014 at 3:00pm: Is Intuition a Guide to Truth? With Alvin Goldman
Turns out that Galileo was right and Aristotle was wrong: in a vacuum, a feather and a bowling ball will fall from a tall building at exactly the same speed. This is not to say that Aristotle wasn’t a brilliant thinker; empirical evidence shows he just had a wrong intuition. Even the most powerful intuitions we have can be misleading. Why is it, then, that many philosophers treat them as crucial when arguing for a conclusion? Can intuitions lead us to important truths about the world, or do they merely teach us about ourselves? John and Ken trust their gut with Alvin Goldman from Rutgers University, author of “Knowledge in a Social World.”

Performer Bios
John Perry is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of California at Riverside, and Henry Waldgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Stanford University. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a recipient of many honors and awards, including the Nicod and Humboldt Prizes. A popular lecturer, in 1990 he was awarded the Dinkelspiel Award for undergraduate teaching. He is the author of over 100 articles and books, including “A Dialogue on Personal Identity” and “Immortality, Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness,” and “Reference and Reflexivity.” He also has the internet’s most popular essay on procrastination.

Ken Taylor is the current Henry Waldgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University. He is also director of Stanford’s interdisciplinary program in Symbolic Systems. His work lies at the intersection of the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind, with an occasional foray into the history of philosophy. He is the author of many books and articles, including “Truth and Meaning, Reference and the Rational Mind,” and the forthcoming “Referring to the World.” He is hard at work on his magnum opus book long in the making called “A Natural History of Normativity,” in which he reduces all things normative to something merely natural.