Venue Details

176 Star Starred
The Colony Theatre
at Cypress 555 North Third Street Burbank, CA 91502
818-558-7000
Venue website Get directions

Reviews & Ratings

115 ratings
4.1 average rating
  • 0
    5
  • 0
    4
  • 0
    3
  • 0
    2
  • 0
    1
96 events
76 reviews
38 stars
attended Oct 28 2006

Here's the review I wrote in my journal:

This afternoon, we went to see The Musical of Musicals: The Musical at The Colony Theatre. So, what did I think of the show?... continued

star this review starred report as inappropriate
45 events
22 reviews
25 stars
attended Oct 20 2006

Stupendous! This was the most fun I've had in a while. The creative genuises behind this musical deserve applause, applause, applause! I loved every note, every move,... continued

star this review starred report as inappropriate
154 events
138 reviews
78 stars
attended Oct 19 2006

Absolutely loved it. I've already recommended it to several friends. The script was witty, the singers were great. I especially enjoyed the performance of Alli Mauzey. ... continued

star this review starred report as inappropriate
View All 7 Reviews
More Information

Quotes & Highlights

“Real wit, real charm! It’s great fun!” —New York Times
“Charming! Funny! Hits its targets with sophisticated affection!” —New York Magazine
“Witty! Refreshing! Juicily merciless!” —Village Voice

Description

Music by Eric Rockwell

Lyrics by Joanne Bogart

Book by Eric Rockwell & Joanne Bogart

The Musical of Musicals (The Musical!) is a musical about … musicals! In a comic satire of musical theatre genres, one story becomes five musicals, each in the distinctive style of a different master of the form, from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Stephen Sondheim.

June, an ingenue who can’t pay the rent, is threatened by her evil landlord. Will the handsome leading man come to her rescue? In an evening of variations on a theme, this basic plot is musicalized the way Rodgers and Hammerstein might have envisioned it, taking place in Kansas in August, complete with a Dream Ballet. The story is then done in the style of Stephen Sondheim, featuring the landlord as a tortured, artistic genius who slashes the throats of his tenants in revenge because they don’t appreciate his art. When presented in the style of Jerry Herman, the story becomes a splashy star vehicle, while the Andrew Lloyd Webber version is a rock musical, with borrowed themes from Puccini. The story is re-told one last time in the style of Kander and Ebb, set in a speakeasy in Chicago . The tone of this evening of satire is loving/irreverent “in a sorry/grateful kind of way.”