Venue Details

167 Star Starred
Auditorium Theatre
50 E. Congress Parkway Chicago, IL 60605
312-341-2310
Venue website Get directions
Nina Sanchez
Go to Greek Islands in the West Loop before the show. They have free valet and great food.
Robert Joffrey's The Nutcracker dining Dec 17 2014 star this tip starred
Goldstar Member
We parked on Wabash 2 blks. N of Congress and had a very good Italian dinner at Pazzo just N of there.
Ina Garten: The Barefoot Contessa dining Nov 07 2014 star this tip starred
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Reviews & Ratings

19 ratings
4.8 average rating
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10 events
1 review
8 stars
attended Mar 13 2013

the best dance troupe ever seen....the theater leaves alot to be desired........hopefully, they will appear at different theater next year

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64 events
12 reviews
6 stars
attended Mar 13 2013

I was not familiar with Alvin Ailey. It was a fun, interesting, beautiful... I will definitely attend future Alvin Ailey performance again.

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Goldstar Member
31 events
8 reviews
2 stars
attended Mar 14 2013

awesome as always. the dance scenes were spectacular. cant wait for the return next year

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More Information

Website

http://auditoriumtheatre.org/wb/pages/home/performances-events/...

Description

*Program Information:

Thursday, March 14 at 7:30 pm: Another Night, Strange Humors/Petite Mort/Revelations

*

*Friday, March 15 at 7:30 pm: *_From Before, Pas de Duke/Home/Revelations_

*Wednesday, March 13 at 7:30 pm: *_Grace/Minus 16/Revelations

_ *_

Another Night_ (Chicago Premiere):* Choreographed by Kyle Abraham

Although Another Night marks his first work for the main Company, Abraham first lent his creative voice to the Ailey organization in 2010 with The Corner_, an acclaimed work commissioned by Ailey II that depicts urban social interactions through the use of contemporary and post-modern movement *

From Before_* : Choreographed by Garth Fagan

Mr. Fagan said of his work: “From Before was looking back at my origins in the West Indies and seeing how I could take away all the trimmings and the costumes of African or Caribbean dance and strip it right down to the bare bones.”  He attributed its popularity with audiences all across the world to “the fluidity of Caribbean dance, the polyrhythms of African, the precision of ballet and the strength and weight of modern dance.” *_

Grace _(New Production):* Choreographed by Ronald K. Brown

One of the most popular works in the Ailey repertory, Ronald K. Brown’s spellbinding Grace is a fervent tour-de-force depicting individuals on a journey to the promised land.  Described by The New York Times as “astounding, something to be sensed as well as seen,” this spiritually-charged work is a rapturous blend of modern dance and West African idioms. *_

Home:_* Choreographed by Rennie Harris

Home_, returning to Auditorium Theatre again for the second year, is choreographed by bold hip-hop choreographer Rennie Harris and is inspired by the stories of people living with or affected by HIV. Drawing upon poems and images submitted in 2011 to the Fight HIV Your Way contest, an initiative of Bristol-Myers Squibb, Harris created a compelling work that conveys both the chilling isolation and uplifting sense of community many experience. *

Minus 16:_* Choreographed by Ohad Naharin

A fan-favorite from last year’s programming, Minus 16 features a delightfully eclectic score ranging from Dean Martin to mambo, techno to traditional Israeli music propels Ohad Naharin’s phenomenally inventive piece. Breaking down the barrier between audience and performer, this work, unlike any other in the Ailey repertory, challenges the dancers to improvise and invite the audience to participate in the experience by joining the dancers onstage.

Pas de Duke: Choreographed by Alvin Ailey

Originally created as a showcase for Judith Jamison and Mikhail Baryshnikov, Pas de Duke is Alvin Ailey’s modern-dance translation of a classical pas de deux, celebrating the musical genius of Duke Ellington. Ailey’s choreography brilliantly captures the exuberance of the dancers’ star qualities and techniques as the duo mirror each other toe-to-toe and line-for-line in this playful, jazzy dance. The New York Times praised the work as “one of those special dances that lives in new ways with each new set of performers.” *_

Petit Mort_ (Company Premiere):* Choreographed by Jiøí Kylián

Visual surprises abound in this tantalizing contemporary ballet, which blends a classical sensibility with a bold, modern wit.  The choreography includes six men, six women, and six fencing foils. The foils are, in many ways, the men’s real dancing partners and sometimes turn out to be more stubborn and willful than a human partner.  *_

Revelations:_* Choreographed by Alvin Ailey

Using African-American spirituals, song-sermons, gospel songs and holy blues, Alvin Ailey’s Revelations fervently explores the places of deepest grief and holiest joy in the soul.  More than just a popular dance work, it has become a cultural treasure, beloved by generations of fans. Seeing Revelations for the first time or the hundredth can be a transcendent experience, with audiences cheering, singing along and dancing in their seats from the opening notes of the plaintive “I Been ’Buked” to the rousing “Wade in the Water” and the triumphant finale, “Rocka My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham.” *_

Strange Humors_ (Company Premiere):* Choreographed by Robert Battle

Artistic Director Robert Battle’s Strange Humors is an eccentric, jocular display for two dancers.  Composer John Mackey, with whom Battle is a frequent collaborator, provides a fiery score propelled by elements of African hand drumming and Middle Eastern folk music. Stationed far apart along a narrow shaft of light, the dancers ultimately meet for an explosive confrontation of wits and prowess, as though “possessed by the force of feelings beyond their control” (The New York Times).