Venue Details

410 Star Starred
Catalina Bar and Grill
6725 West Sunset Blvd. Hollywood, CA 90028
323-466-2210
Venue website Get directions
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Description

Enjoy a three-course meal and wines from Presidio Winery and Jake-Ryan Cellars while listening to the legendary Buddy Collette Quintet, Linda Hopkins and Ernie Andrews. A cocktail reception precedes the concert.

Buddy Collette Quintet

When it comes to unsung jazz heroes, Buddy Collette’s talents on tenor saxophone, flute, and clarinet are as close to unmatched as it gets. A gifted composer of classical music in addition to his jazz pedigree, Collette continues to fly almost defiantly under the radar of greater renown. Along with saxophonist Dexter Gordon bassist Charles Mingus, and drummer Chico Hamilton, he helped keep bebop alive in the Los Angeles’s historic Central Avenue neighborhood. In 1933, at the age of 12, Collette formed his first jazz ensemble. The group contained Charles Mingus, who Buddy convinced to switch from cello to bass. Collette quickly became one of the city’s first bebop players. He became the first African American to perform in a television studio band, appearing on Groucho Marx’s television show “You Bet Your Life.” In 1955, he became a founding member of drummer Chico Hamilton’s legendary quintet. Today, Collette is receiving more recognition than ever.

Linda Hopkins

An extremely versatile singer and performer with extensive stage credentials alongside her vocal skills, Linda Hopkins has been a major artist since the early ’50s. She has recorded classic, traditional, and urban blues, done R&B and soul, jazz, and show tunes, all with distinction and style. Hopkins has long idolized Bessie Smith and won critical plaudits for her rendition of Smith in the theatrical presentation “Jazz Train.” She has recorded for numerous labels since the ’50s, but has only earned one chart hit, a duet with Jackie Wilson for Brunswick in 1963. “Shake A Hand” narrowly missed the R&B Top 20, peaking at #21. She remains active, but with only a limited amount of material in circulation, especially on domestic labels. (All Music Guide)

Ernie Andrews

Ernie Andrews has managed to be both popular and underrated throughout his lengthy career. After his family moved to Los Angeles, he sang in a church choir, and while still attending high school had a few hits for the G&G label. Billy Eckstine and Al Hibbler were early influences and, after reaching maturity, Andrews was somewhat in the shadow of Joe Williams (who has a similar style). Andrews recorded for Aladdin, Columbia, and London in the late ‘40s, spent six years singing with the Harry James Orchestra, and cut a couple of big band dates for GNP/Crescendo during 1958-1959. Despite his unchanging style, Andrews was mostly in obscurity during the 1960s and ’70s, just making a couple of albums for Dot during 1965-1966. A 1980 Discovery date found him in excellent form, and in the ’80s, he was rediscovered. Andrews recorded with the Capp/Pierce Juggernaut, Gene Harris’ Superband, Jay McShann, and with the Harper Brothers, in addition to making a few sets in the 1990s for Muse, and later High Note. He is also prominent in the documentary Blues for Central Avenue. (All Music Guide)

This event benefits the Stroke Association of Southern California; your ticket is tax-deductible.

About the Ticket Supplier: What A Pair

Proceeds from What a Pair benefit the John Wayne Cancer Institute.