Venue Details

1212 Star Starred
Jones Hall for the Performing Arts
615 Louisiana Street Houston, TX 77002
713-227-3974
Venue website Get directions
Linda Jackson
If you can, park at the Theater District Parking Garage! The garage had an entrance from underground straight to Jones Hall. It was only $10 and security offered a ride on their golf cart to the entrance and to our car after the show.
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Linda Jackson
I wore a nice sunday dress. Wear church clothes or something like jeans and a nice blouse, button down shirt..
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Quotes & Highlights

Watch Leila Josefowicz performan excerpt from Sibelius’ Violin Concerto on YouTube.

Description

Leila Josefowicz hopped on the fast lane to stardom very early in her career, and she hasn’t stopped amazing audiences around the world ever since. She returns to Houston to perform Sibelius’ Violin Concerto with the equally brilliant Kirill Karabits at the podium.

Program:

Silvestrov: Elegy

Sibelius: Violin Concerto

Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3, Scottish

Kirill Karabits, conductor

Leila Josefowicz, violin

About the Ticket Supplier: Houston Symphony

Founded in 1913, the Houston Symphony is one of America’s oldest performing arts organizations, with a distinguished musical history. Over the years, the orchestra has grown and matured under the direction of distinguished leaders such as Ernst Hoffmann (1936-47), Efrem Kurtz (1948-54), Ferenc Fricsay (1954), Leopold Stokowski (1955-61), Sir John Barbirolli (1961-67), André Previn (1967-69), Lawrence Foster (1971-78), Sergiu Comissiona (1979-88) and Christoph Eschenbach (1988-99). Maestro Hans Graf, who took the podium in September 2001, is the Houston Symphony’s fifteenth music director.

The orchestra came of age in the 1940s, when Maestros Hoffmann and Kurtz began hiring highly talented professional musicians, many of whom remained with the orchestra for more than 30 years. Leopold Stokowski brought the Symphony international recognition by commissioning new works and making recordings, and, in Sir John Barbirolli’s years, the Houston Symphony flowered under the influence of his lush romantic style. The orchestra moved into Jones Hall, its current home, in 1966, and in 1971, the Symphony signed its first 52-week contract with the musicians. Today, the Houston Symphony is widely acclaimed as one of the top orchestras in the world.

Each year the Houston Symphony performs approximately 170 concerts for more than 350,000 Houstonians. The season includes the Fidelity Investments Classical Series; the 6-concert classical Shell Favorite Masters series, Great Performers and TOTAL Gold Classics series; the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pops at Jones Hall series; Weatherford Family Concerts; the Chevron Fiesta Sinfónica Familiar and the Houston Chronicle Dollar Concert; a summer series at The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion and KPRC Local 2 Summer Symphony Nights at Miller Outdoor Theatre where the orchestra has performed for more than 60 years. The season also includes six SoundPlusVision concerts underwritten by the Albert and Margaret Alkek Foundation, and the JPMorgan Chase Summer in the City series.

The Symphony’s Music Matters! education program reaches over 40,000 students from various school districts who attend David Dewhurst Symphony Explorer and Macy’s Symphony Detective concerts. Every summer the orchestra tours the region with free family Sounds Like Fun! concerts, underwritten by the Robert and Janice McNair Foundation, and reaching 13,000 Houstonians. The Houston Symphony honors educators each year at the Spec’s Charitable Foundation Salute to Educators Concert. The Symphony’s educational partners include the Houston Independent School District and five other area school districts, as well as many private schools.

Through the GDF SUEZ Community Connections program, musicians serve the community as soloists, master class teachers and ensemble performers, lecturers, recitalists, touring and in student competitions. They also educate and entertain more than 22,000 area residents in schools, hospitals, retirement homes, shelters and community centers. Through programs like Fidelity Futurestage and Deloitte Dynamics, the Houston Symphony in partnership with business corporations provide music education opportunities and instruments to deserving band students at local high schools.