Venue Details

164 Star Starred
Irvine Barclay Theatre
4242 Campus Drive Irvine, CA 92612
949-854-4646
Venue website Get directions
Jason Grove
I wore a light sweater for inside since the AC was turned on high..
Tomatito dress Aug 06 2014 star this tip starred
Roberta Jones
Lots of places to eat across the street.
MenAlive Top of the Charts dining Jul 04 2014 star this tip starred
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Reviews & Ratings

9 ratings
3.6 average rating
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79 events
33 reviews
45 stars
attended Feb 13 2008

Fun show and great seats, but after an hour and a half with no intermssion, everything started to sound the same!

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DSH
22 events
13 reviews
33 stars
attended Feb 13 2008

nice venue-- small so all seats are good. good for exposure to African music but to people who are not used to it (like me), the songs all sound the same and have little variation.. but it was an inexpensive night out.

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11 events
5 reviews
4 stars
attended Feb 13 2008

I had no idea what to expect (hoped it was like good regae music). Well, they started off (and continued) with very good music. The only problem was that their words were VERY hard to make sense of, therefore no meaning. I did not care for the...continued

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More Information

Quotes & Highlights

Hear Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars at their Myspace page.

Description

Irvine Barclay Theatre is delighted to present one of Africa’a hottest bands, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars.

Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars tour the world spreading their message of peace and love in a “can’t help but dance” show that fans from all musical backgrounds can enjoy, crafting music in a spirited fusion of traditional West African music, roots reggae and rhythmic traditional folk. The Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars are included along with R.E.M., U2, Green Day, and others on the hit CD, Instant Karma: The Amnesty International Campaign to Save Darfur released in June 2007. This double disc benefit compilation of John Lennon songs features SLRAS collaborating with Aerosmith on “Give Peace A Chance.” Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry has told Billboard, “… Their music is so buoyant and joyful.” Indeed, the music and live performances of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars is winning over legions of new fans. Lauded for their infectious sound and engaging concerts, the All-Stars are, as Don Heckman of the Los Angeles Times says, “establishing an identity based as much on skill, imagination and charisma as on their undeniably touching story.”

Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars have been touring the world extensively since the summer of 2006. They have played on five continents. Their touring highlights range from performances at The Kennedy Center, Save the Children’s 75th Anniversary Benefit (honoring former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush as well as Melinda Gates), the Hollywood Bowl, headlining at Central Park Summerstage, a post screening Q&A in New York City with fellow Sierra Leonean and best selling author Ishmael Beah, to stand-out appearances at festivals as diverse as the Montreal Jazz Festival, the Fuji Rock Festival in Japan, Chicago’s African Festival of the Arts, Transmusicales Festival in France, the Winnipeg Folk Festival, Scotland’s T in the Park, the Oxegen Festival in Ireland and Bonnaroo.  Their summer tour followed a successful cross-country tour of Australia, playing the country’s famed East & West Coast Blues & Roots Festivals and two performances at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

In the past year, the group has appeared on Oprah Winfrey, CBS’ Sunday Morning, CNN, and NPR’s “Talk of the Nation.”  Their music was featured in the five-time Academy Award-nominated film Blood Diamond starring Leonardo DiCaprio, and they were joined onstage in Nashville by new friends Joe Perry and Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, who later asked SLRAS to open for them at the Mohegan Sun Arena in CT.

   

The Sierra Leone Refugee All-Stars are comprised of musicians who lived for years as refugees in a camp in the West African nation of Guinea after being forced to flee their country, Sierra Leone, during a decade-long civil war. With the help of a refugee organization they acquired a couple of old electric guitars and a sound system and began to make music. Near the turn of the 21st century, rebel forces attacked Freetown, the capital city of Sierra Leone, forcing a panicked mass exodus to neighboring countries. Among the thousands who fled were musicians and future band mates Reuben Koroma and Francis Lamgba (Franco) who connected in a refugee camp in Guinea, West Africa. Along with Reuben’s wife Grace they began making music for their fellow refugees, providing a welcome distraction to life in the camps. Safety in the Kalia camp quickly disintegrated, however, when it came under attack from the Guinean army and citizenry. The fledgling band was evacuated and relocated to a camp set deep in the remote Guinean countryside. It was here that, thanks to a Canadian refugee aid organization, the developing band was able to acquire the rusted-out sound system and beat up electric guitars that helped officially launch the group.

It was also in this camp that American documentary filmmakers Banker White and Zach Niles along with Canadian singer-songwriter Chris Velan encountered the group, which by that point also included Black Nature, a teenaged orphan with a gift for rap, as well as Abdulrahim Kamara (Arahim) and Mohamed Bangura (Medo), both of whom had had limbs amputated by the rebels. The first-time filmmakers followed the band for three years as they moved from camp to camp. While filming, the United Nations sponsored a trip for the group to return to Freetown so they could see for themselves that the war was indeed over and safe for thousands of refugees to return home.  As part of the trip, the UNHCR offered the band the opportunity to make their first studio recordings, which led to leader Reuben Koroma uniting the core group from the refugee camp with his former band mates, The Emperors, many of whom had remained in Freetown during the war. Together they recorded their debut album as Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars. The current touring lineup features members of both entities.

Produced by Chris Velan, Living Like A Refugee (released by ANTI- Records on September 26, 2006) was recorded throughout the production of the Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars film, between August 2002 and October 2005. Each song is an original composition written during their years in exile and taken as a whole the album serves as a musical document of the band’s incredible journey. The album features field recordings from the refugee camps in Guinea as well as studio efforts at Sam Jones’ Island Studios in Freetown.  While each of the stories in these songs is told from the band’s personal experience, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars’ messages of hope, healing and peace are truly universal.

Backed by the likes of Keith Richards, Sir Paul McCartney, Ice Cube, Angelina Jolie, and executive producers Steve Bing and Shelley Lazar, the documentary film, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars, has won thirteen major awards as of this writing, including the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the AFI Film Festival 2005, the Audience Favorite Award at the Miami Film Festival 2006, the Filmmaker’s Award for Social Change and the Emerging Pictures Audience Award (bestowed on the winner by voting audiences in eleven cities) at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival 2006, Best of the Fest at the Human Rights Watch Film Fest and the Impact of Music Award at the Nashville Film Fest. The film was broadcast on PBS on June 26, 2007.

Only recently having emerged from refugee status themselves, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars have already begun helping others still in need through their work with Amnesty International, the United Nations ninemillion.org campaign, the ONE campaign, Witness and numerous others in the U.S. and internationally, speaking out for peace and against the insanity of war while calling attention to issues in Africa and the plight of refugees throughout the world. The New York Times critic, Stephen Holden, wrote, “As harrowing as these personal tales may be, the music buoying them is uplifting. The cliché bears repeating: music heals and creates community.”