Venue Details

1790 Star Starred
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
135 N. Grand Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90012
213-972-7211
Venue website Get directions
Goldstar Member
The dinner at the outdoor Patina is good, but for a snack there is a good Taco stand nearby
The Dizzy Feet Foundation's Celebration of Dance dining Jul 21 2014 star this tip starred
Goldstar Member
I wore a nice shirt and pants.
The Dizzy Feet Foundation's Celebration of Dance dress Jul 21 2014 star this tip starred

Reviews & Ratings

149 ratings
4.2 average rating
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5 events
2 reviews
2 stars
attended Dec 09 2007

It was a minimilistic opera meaning there were costumes but not elaborate sets. My husband LOVED it. I enjoyed it since the set design was very creative to be so minimilistic, but I prefere operas with elaborate sets and costumes.

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155 events
97 reviews
0 stars
attended Dec 07 2007

A great production of a great opera. Always fun to see how a company will sex up with action what is not written on the libretto.

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59 events
29 reviews
4 stars
attended Dec 09 2007

This is by far the worst production I have ever seen of anything in my entire life (and I've seen hundreds and hundreds of operas, plays, etc.). This opera is hard to ruin but the director did a bang-up job. I can't begin to describe the anger I...continued

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View All 89 Reviews
More Information

Website

http://www.losangelesopera.com/productions/0708/dongiovanni/index.htm

Quotes & Highlights

“The eye is startled, delighted, and sometimes enlightened by constant visual stimulation.” -Los Angeles Times (from their review of the 2003 production)

Description

Don Juan’s back and LA Opera’s got him! The sexy and sensual Erwin Schrott returns as opera’s greatest Lothario in the ravishing production that won LA Opera kudos in 2003. The Los Angeles Times commented: “The eye is startled, delighted, and sometimes enlightened by constant visual stimulation.”

Mozart’s great comic drama not only catalogs the Don’s conquests (2,065 women, to be exact), but also deftly unfolds an intriguing series of escalating calamities that ensue as those he seduced and abandoned seek their revenge against him. And when the Don disdainfully invites a vengeful ghost to dinner, all hell breaks loose.