Venue Details

1724 Star Starred
B.B. King Blues Club
Between 7th and 8th Avenues 237 West 42nd Street New York City, NY 10036
212-997-4144
Venue website Get directions
DeBo
B.B.Kings is not just a Blues club. :-)
Singer Oleta Adams info Jun 29 2014 star this tip starred
DeBo
B.B.Kings has an adjoining club/bar/restaurant called Lucille's that you can stop in and have drinks after any of the main shows @ B.B.'s
Singer Oleta Adams info Jun 29 2014 star this tip starred

Reviews & Ratings

3 ratings
4.3 average rating
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2 events
2 reviews
1 stars
attended Nov 22 2010

coco was great but the set was to short it took me longer to get there then he played

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More Information

Website

http://www.bbkingblues.com/bio.php?id=3155

Quotes & Highlights

“In a world of blues guitar pretenders, Coco Montoya is the real McCoy. Be prepared to get scorched.” —Billboard
Hear Montoya at his website.

Description

Over the course of his almost 40-year career, guitarist and vocalist Coco Montoya’s explosive guitar playing and soul-driven voice have propelled him to the upper reaches of the blues-rock world. From his early days as a drummer to his current status as one of the top-drawing guitarists and vocalists on the blues-rock scene, Montoya has forged his reputation through years of hard work and constant touring. And it all started with a chance meeting in the mid-1970s with legendary bluesman Albert Collins, who offered Montoya a gig as his drummer. Collins took an immediate liking to Montoya, becoming his mentor and teaching his new protege secrets of the Collins “icy hot” style of blues guitar. Five years later, John Mayall happened to catch Montoya at a jam session and was blown away. As a result, Montoya spent 10 years touring the world with the legendary Bluesbreakers.

With a career that spans over three decades, John Hammond is one of handful of white blues musicians who was on the scene at the beginning of the first blues renaissance of the mid-’60s. Some critics have described him as a white Robert Johnson, and Hammond does justice to classic blues by combining powerful guitar and harmonica playing with expressive vocals and a dignified stage presence. Within the first decade of his career as a performer, Hammond began crafting a niche for himself that is completely his own: the solo guitar man, harmonica slung in a rack around his neck, reinterpreting classic blues songs from the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s.