Venue Details

108 Star Starred
Shelton Theater
533 Sutter St. San Francisco, CA 94102
415-882-9100
Venue website Get directions
Goldstar Member
The theater has a great little bar - cheap and the b artgender tghe night we went gave extremely generous wine pours. For food, we ate at the Bangkok cafe, a little slot restaurant on Powell up about a block and a half from BART. You may be the only non-Asians inside - a mark of good, authentic food. GREAT dinner for 2 was $16.86! Our favoritge SF restaurant!
Foodies! The Musical dining Jun 09 2014 star this tip starred
Goldstar Member
The Powell street BART station is just 3 blocks away. Parking would be expensive and difficult.
Foodies! The Musical travel Jun 09 2014 star this tip starred
More Information

Quotes & Highlights

“The Kafka-esque scenario of Indigo Don’t Vote is eerily similar to Steven Spielberg’s film The Terminal.” SF Weekly
“It is witty and intelligent and sports a collection of charismatic and bizarre actors.” Orange Age

Description

Shelton Theater, in collaboration with Manjomang Productions, presents the debut of Indigo Don’t Vote, a dark comedy directed by Matt Shelton.

Indigo Don’t Vote

By Andrew Ward and Gabriel Goldstein

Directed by Matthew Shelton

Review from SF Weekly:

“The Kafka-esque scenario of Indigo Don’t Vote, a dark staged comedy written by Andrew Ward and Gabriel Goldstein, is eerily similar to Steven Spielberg’s film The Terminal: Each work includes a Third World country that has ceased to exist, an airplane, and an oft-repeated catchword that sums up the quirky circumstances — The Terminal’s ‘unacceptable’ to Indigo’s ‘discontinued.’ The main characters in the two stories, however, react to the vanished countries in wholly different ways. One falls in love with Catherine Zeta-Jones and eats gift-shop crackers; the other, an inert loafer who ‘lacks the passion to pursue anything,’ is finally motivated to warn against a world that seems to be disappearing. He turns to friends, a senator, a psychiatrist, the media, and anarchists for help with the sticky problem of ‘non-ness’ — and receives a predictable zilch. Written in 2002 against the backdrop of troops massing in Iraq, the play presents a new modern malaise: that of disappearing through the information gap.”