Venue Details

21 Star Starred
San Francisco Conservatory of Music
between Van Ness and Franklin 50 Oak Street San Francisco, CA 94102
415-864-7326
Venue website Get directions
ratevka
Great new venue; be4 concert, talked with intern for Nadia of NCCO, so he knew lots
On Broadway info Aug 13 2012 star this tip starred
ratevka
Ate at Arlequin
On Broadway info Aug 13 2012 star this tip starred
More Information

Website

http://symphonyparnassus.org/?page_id=1782

Description

Symphony Parnassus, with music director Stephen Paulson, will celebrate the great 20th century French composers with two performances of its New Year’s concert program: Sunday, January 15th at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and Sunday, January 22nd at the new Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Center.

Symphony Parnassus will begin its program with Faure’s “Ballade for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 19”, followed by Ravel’s “Concerto for the Left Hand.” Both pieces will feature renowned pianist Helene Wickett, a leading authority on French music.

The Orchestra will continue its celebration of French composers with Debussy’s “Iberia”, from his “Images Pour Orchestre, No. 2”, which is a love letter to the composer’s beloved neighbor, Spain. Although Debussy only visited the country once, his study of the local art, songs and culture enabled him to capture in music the flavor of Spanish life. He did this with a mastery that was second to none, according to the leading Spanish composers of the time: de Falla and Albeniz.

The program’s French theme will also be represented in the concerts’ featured artwork, “Cappuccino with Friends”, by Michael Flohr, one of Southern California’s hottest young “urban” artists.

*Program: 

*Faure – Ballade for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 19

Ravel – Concerto for the Left Hand

Debussy – Images for Orchestra, No. 2, Iberia

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About the Ticket Supplier: Symphony Parnassus

Symphony Parnassus encompasses the talents of musicians from the Bay Area community. Originally called the UCSF Orchestra, it was founded in 1989 by Jonathan Davis, then a graduate student in Biophysics.