Venue Details

752 Star Starred
The Triple Door
Corner of Union & 3rd Ave. 216 Union Street Seattle, WA 98101
206-838-4333
Venue website Get directions
Goldstar Member
Food served at Triple Door is from Wild Ginger -- they are famous for their duck. Got the duck last night and my table mates were eyeing it wistfully. Did not disappoint.
Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra dining Apr 22 2014 star this tip starred
Diane Lee
I wore casual clothes, but there was a variety, from nice/casual to dressy.
Singer-Songwriter Meklit Hadero dress Apr 01 2014 star this tip starred

Reviews & Ratings

6 ratings
4.8 average rating
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14 events
7 reviews
0 stars
attended Jul 26 2010

Fabulous! Great music, high energy, tight, playful set. Renato and the other three musicians are exceptional. Highly recommended. Seating was great - Triple Door, as always, had wonderful food and terrific service. A very fun night.

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7 events
5 reviews
2 stars
attended Jul 26 2010

What a fun and amazing concert! All of the musicians were masters! I never knew the flute could make that many different sounds.

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5 events
5 reviews
3 stars
attended Jul 26 2010

High energy performances with lots of charisma, musical skill and experienced ensemble communication -- pure delight.

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More Information

Website

http://tripledoor.net/Calendar/Events/July-2010/Renato-Borghetti....

Quotes & Highlights

Visit Renato Borghetti website to hear music samples.

Description

The gaita ponto – driven folk of Rio Grande do Sul, possesses great power and intensity. With that kind of music, Borghetti has enjoyed a degree of success surprising for any artist who remains faithful to his folk roots. Not that Renato Borghetti´s music is hidebound or purist: he has revised, adapted, and modernized many of the native tunes of Rio Grande do Sul; he does not shy away from more typical forms from the wide spectrum of Brazilian and global pop – samba, jazz, tango, and beyond. Each of those forms he adapts to his unique style of accordion playing.

The accordion´s journey thorough Brazilian music dramatizes the many elements and influences of Brazilian music – and society – itself. Brazilian music has so many conflicting and harmonizing influences that the painful , creative histories of pre – Columbian America, European imperialism, and post – colonial struggles can be heard in its strains. The accordion is first a European instrument , popular in many variations among working people throughout the European continent, with particularly recognizable styles rooted in southern Europe. It was the Portuguese colonists who first brought the accordion to Brazil – but twentieth – century Italian immigrants their own influences to Brazilian playing.

Brazilian folk styles of accordion playing were never, however, solely European. Accordionists quickly picked up chant – like and modal qualities from native people, violating the European dance forms; to those odd blends were added the complex, syncopated rhythms of the African slaves who became an important part of the country´s population during the Portuguese colonization. Thus did the development of Brazilian accordion music – taking place, for the most part, far from the musical centers of Rio de Janeiro and Salvador Bahia – parallel the development of more familiar Brazilian forms like samba, which also blended European dance and religious music with native influences and a powerful dose of African percussion.

Parallels with the development of accordion playing in the southern part of the United States also come to mind: in bayou and Tex – Mex culture, French folk singing and dancing, the music of later German and other immigrants to Louisiana, and black, Latin, and native American rhythms combined to make the zydeco accordion an instrument of grater heat, intensity, and power than its antecedents could ever have suggested. It is perhaps just such intensity in Renato Borghetti´s accordion playing that has made him a popular mainstream artist even as he renovates the folk sounds of Rio Grande do Sul – a success that is all the more surprising for a musician who has generally focused on instrumental rather than vocal music.

Brazilian listeners are sophisticated, at home with jazz and folk as well as with more accessible pop forms: Borghetti recorded his first album in 1984, and it was instantly successful. Later albums were even more popular; his second release, for example, was the first gold record in Brazil ever feature exclusively instrumental music. Renato Borghetti has also reached out from the older forms to samba and tango, among other styles. His playing is uncompromising in its loyalty to a folkloric past, adventurous in its openness to new ideas. by William HogelandIt is perhaps just such intensity in Renato Borghetti´s accordion playing that has made him a popular mainstream artist even as he renovates the folk sounds of Rio Grande do Sul – a success that is all the more surprising for a musician who has generally focused on instrumental rather than vocal music. Brazilian listeners are sophisticated, at home with jazz and folk as well as with more accessible pop forms: Borghetti recorded his first album in 1984, and it was instantly successful.

Later albums were even more popular; his second release, for example, was the first gold record in Brazil ever feature exclusively instrumental music. Renato Borghetti has also reached out from the older forms to samba and tango, among other styles. His playing is uncompromising in its loyalty to a folkloric past, adventurous in its openness to new ideas

Notes by William Hogeland