Venue Details

22 Star Starred
Gore Place
Between Richgrain and Lawndale 52 Gore Street Waltham, MA 02453
781-894-2798
Venue website Get directions
Goldstar Member
I would recommend bringing a flashlight. It's dark walking up to the mansion and also wear flat shoes.
Gore Place Evening Tours info Sep 23 2013 star this tip starred
luckyredtail
The weather was warm summer evening. I wore light clothes as it was warm in the house..
Gore Place Evening Tours dress Aug 26 2013 star this tip starred
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Reviews & Ratings

46 ratings
4.2 average rating
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3 events
2 reviews
0 stars
attended Mar 29 2008

This was a very enjoyable tour. I'm a bit embarrassed to say that I've passed by the Gore mansion hundreds of times but never visited it before. The Jane Austen aspect was charming but had no connection to the mansion. They were quotes of comments...continued

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1 events
1 review
0 stars
attended Feb 23 2008

The Jane Austen tour was a great tie-in to Gore Place. I had never been there before, but I will definitely go back! While we were waiting for the tour, we noticed people coming in to rent snowshoes to go wandering on the property-who knew?!

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15 events
1 review
1 stars
attended Jul 20 2008

I thought it was very ineresting and I thought the guide was terrific. Unfortunately, it was a very hot day outside, and therefore even hotter inside the mansion where the air just hung very heavily. Felt as if we were in a sauna, and that really...continued

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More Information

Website

http://www.goreplace.org/austen-tours.htm

Description

Born in 1775, Jane Austen (Emma, Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility) lived her entire life in England until her death in1817. Christopher and Rebecca Gore lived in England from 1796 to 1804. The grand mansion they built in Waltham, Massachusetts in 1806 features both French and English influence in the design and greatly resembles the manor houses described in Austen’s novels.

During these special tours, a guide in period costume will use the famous author’s own words to describe the decor of the mansion and the gracious lifestyle of the Gores.

The mansion at Gore Place was built in 1806 and served as a summer home for Christopher and Rebecca Gore where the Gores entertained such notable dignitaries as Daniel Webster and James Monroe.

Today the house and grounds are owned and operated by the Gore Place Society, a nonprofit members organization dedicated to the preservation and restoration of Gore Place.

Christopher Gore’s political career began in 1788 when he was elected to represent Boston at the Philadelphia convention to ratify the new United States Constitution. A year later George Washington appointed Gore the first United States Attorney for Massachusetts. President Washington again appointed Gore to a diplomatic position in 1796. The Gores traveled to England and remained there for eight years while Christopher served on the Jay Commission that negotiated mercantile claims for American ships seized or destroyed during the war with Britain. Gore also spent two months as chargé d’affaires in London after his good friend Rufus King resigned from his post and before James Monroe, the new ambassador, arrived. The suit Christopher Gore wore when formally presented to the king and queen is on display at Gore Place.

Today the house is furnished with fine art and antiques of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Christopher and Rebecca Gore had no children, so after Mrs. Gore’s death, in accordance with her husband’s will, the house and all its contents were sold at auction. A few of their possessions survived in the hands of nieces, nephews, friends, and neighbors and have been returned to Gore Place. After 1834 Gore Place became home to several other families. In 1921 it passed out of private hands when the Waltham Country Club established a golf course and tennis courts on the grounds. During the Depression, the country club failed and the property fell into disrepair. In 1935, the bank was about to tear down the buildings and sell off the land for housing, when Mrs. Helen Patterson gathered her friends and the financial resources necessary to preserve it. The Gore Place Society was founded that same year. Over the past seventy years, Gore Place has been lovingly restored and open to the public as one of the great estates of the Federal era.

About the Ticket Supplier: Gore Place

Gore Place Society's mission is to preserve and promote the 1806 estate of Christopher and Rebecca Gore as a unique educational resource to inspire an appreciation of early 19th-century America.