Venue Details

32 Star Starred
Theatre on the Run
3700 South Four Mile Run Drive Arlington, VA 22206
703-228-1850
Venue website Get directions
Brian
36 events
10 reviews
3 stars
Only a few parking spaces at the theatre, but plenty of street parking. If you'd like to combine the theatre with dining or shopping, consider parking at the free garage over the Harris Teeter in Shirlington Village. There's a walking bridge directly across from that over Four Mile Run, a 5 minute walk to the theatre.
Dinner With Friends
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25 events
18 reviews
6 stars
Parking can be a bit of a challenge so give yourself enough time to walk a couple of blocks.
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Reviews & Ratings

Keegan Theatre's "Acts of Love"
6 ratings
3.0 average rating
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36 events
2 reviews
17 stars
attended Aug 21 2009

Thought the writing was awful and the acting not much better.

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49 events
27 reviews
5 stars
attended Aug 22 2009

not up to the caliber of the
Keegan's usual high quality productions. The female actor will probably improve her performances as she matures. Her lack of confidence impacted the entire play.

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49 events
27 reviews
5 stars
attended Aug 15 2009

superb performance. we plan on seeing the next play.

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More Information

Description

**August 14-15: Love Letters

**Gurney is the author of many highly acclaimed plays, including The Cocktail Hour, The Dining Room, Scenes from American Life, and The Middle Ages. In 1990, Love Letters was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in Drama. He is also the author of three novels and the recipient of the Drama Desk Award and the Award of Merit from the Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.

Love Letters by A. R. Gurney focuses on two characters born between the wars.  Melissa Gardner and Andrew Makepeace Ladd III maintain correspondence through letters over the course of fifty years.  These funny, painful, and sometimes, unremarkable letters reveal their desires and frustrations as they grow into their separate lives.  A. R. Gurney suggests that his emphasis in this play on the importance of writing is more than coincidental.

“This letter, which I’m writing with my own hand, with my own pen, in my own penmanship, comes from me and no one else, and is a present of myself to you.”**

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August 21-22: Slow Dancing in a Burning Room**

Slow Dancing in a Burning Room is a world premiere one-act play written by Keegan company member, Megan Thrift.  The dramatist presents us with Maggie, a young and talented bartender, who seems full of spirit and possibility.  But she is trapped, struggling to maintain her own dreams, a failing business, and familial responsibility.  Clint is alone at the bar nursing some old wounds, and when he and Maggie start a conversation, they find themselves kindred spirits.  These two vulnerable souls search for answers with the help of each other’s perspective and, in the end, must decide whether to accept the things they cannot change or “change the things they cannot accept.” **

August 28-29: False Romance: An Intergalactic Farce

False Romance: An Intergalactic Farce, written by Joe Baker, is an adapted and lengthened 10-minute play originally titled, When Jason Met Maggala.  While exploring the unexpected tribulations of the future, this piece reveals the everlasting conventions of young love.  Maggie breaks up with Jason, which drives Jason to ask his friend, Rod, how to get Maggie back.  Unbeknownst to Jason, Rod and Maggie have a secret.  Rod offers some bad advice to Jason, and Rod meets the attractive Bea, who he, inevitably, falls for.  Bea finally locates her lost friend, Jason, and the two chat before he is able to follow through with his plan.  Jason realizes that Rod has been deceiving him, and this leads Bea and Rod to plan a picnic in the park with their friends, Jason and Maggie.  With all four humanoids sitting down on one picnic blanket, the air is cleared and their intentions are exposed.  Words are spoken, tensions rise, and eventually a proposal is made.  But who proposes what to whom?