Venue Details

12 Star Starred
Boston Playwrights' Theatre - Odyssey Theatre
at Harry Agganis Way 949 Commonwealth Ave Boston, MA 02215
866-811-4111
Venue website Get directions
22 events
18 reviews
11 stars
Got lucky with a spot on the street. Good luck in the rest room: very tight quarters.
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KAREN VAN KENNEN
66 events
10 reviews
43 stars
The weather was freezing (28). I wore warm clothes. It's a very casual venue (college kids)..
Absence
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Reviews & Ratings

"Junkie"
8 ratings
4.6 average rating
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5 events
3 reviews
0 stars
attended Aug 25 2011

I had never seen a play at the Boston Playwrights' Theatre. The theater is small and intimate, but as with other black-box theaters is capable of really recreating itself for every show, which makes for some real creative possibilities. I attended...continued

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14 events
9 reviews
3 stars
attended Aug 31 2011

I loved this play-Sean Cote was terrific in his part-It was as if he actually had an addiction and knew what to expect-I liked the small theatre where you could see and hear clearly--great show

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19 events
9 reviews
4 stars
attended Sep 02 2011

The play was a one person monologue about 30 days in Rehab. Very emotional, enlightening.

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More Information

Quotes & Highlights

Read an article about the play from the_ Somerville News_.

Description

Written by John Shea

Directed by Brett Marks

Starring Sean A. Cote

_

Is it possible to turn your life around in thirty days?_ A close look at one man’s search for redemption and understanding, Junkie follows Cal, a Somerville heroin addict, as he undergoes thirty days in a state rehabilitation center. Over this brief span of sobriety, Cal confronts not only the choices which brought him to rehab, but also the world that made him who he is. Funny and unapologetic, Junkie shows us the path to recovery is not always a clear trail.