Venue Details

8640 Star Starred
Warner Theatre
513 13th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20004
202-783-4000
Venue website Get directions
If you're going to a late show, try to find a parking space on the street - it's free, parking in a garage costs about $20 on a Saturday night and most garages are either full by the time you get there and you run the risk of it being closed by the time you get out of your show/are ready to go home.
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If you want to eat at Chef Geoff's before the show, you should make a reservation.
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Reviews & Ratings

46 ratings
4.2 average rating
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34 events
24 reviews
14 stars
attended May 08 2014

started late, no playbill, 25 min intermission ... I left at 10:45 PM and the play wasn't over. The singing was good, as well as the acting.

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34 events
24 reviews
14 stars
attended May 08 2014

super long line at Will Call, Super Long Line to get inside Warner Theatre. Play started late, no playbill, 25 min intermission, problems with the sound ... loud abrupt noises throughout the play. I left at 10:45 PM and the play was still...continued

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4 events
1 review
1 stars
attended May 08 2014

The play Independent Woman was wonderful! The night that we saw the play the audio equipment was of poor quality. There were loud burst at times and at times there was no sound.

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Member Photos
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More Information

Website

http://warnertheatredc.com/event-calendar

About the Ticket Supplier: Warner Theatre

The Warner’s special place in the history of Washington began in the 1920s when dozens of grand theaters and moviehouses lit up downtown. Built first for vaudeville and silent movies, the Theatre was opened as the Earle Theatre in 1924.

The Earle switched to a movies-only policy in 1945 and in 1947, owner Harry Warner, one of the Hollywood’s Warner Brothers, visited Washington and told his tour guide Julian Brylawski (one of the original builders) that since he owned the theatre, his name should be on the marquee. Thus the Earle Theatre became the Warner Theatre.