Venue Details

37 events
19 reviews
2 stars
Park next door to Kennedy Center for just $12 or $13 - two parking garages available.
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16 events
12 reviews
4 stars
Parking is $23. Park around GW and take the shuttle if you can.
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Reviews & Ratings

Peter Brook's "Fragments"
13 ratings
4.7 average rating
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100 events
61 reviews
8 stars
attended Apr 14 2011

Dialogue was difficult to understand.

Whole idea was absurdity on stage.

Was overly repeated wording just to make the work last one hour.

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55 events
10 reviews
3 stars
attended Apr 14 2011

The evening involved five short pieces by Samuel Beckett presented by three actors. If you like Beckett, this was a top-notch evening. The actors were simply brillant, and the pieces were sad/funny/profound/provoking. A wonderful theater...continued

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35 events
8 reviews
3 stars
attended Apr 16 2011

Samuel Becket 5 short plays, the actors performances and Peter Brook's direction combined in delivering a dazzling, moving commentary on human condition. Fabulous theatrical experience!

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More Information

Quotes & Highlights

“They give us Beckett distilled. And in the hands of Brook…the sharp observation of human conduct is lovingly delivered.” —The Financial Times


C.I.C.T./Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord, Paris

Peter Brook’s


By Samuel Beckett

Directed by Peter Brook

Co-directed by Marie-Hélène Estienne

Revered director Peter Brook, returning to the Kennedy Center for the first time since 1973, brings together five short works by playwright Samuel Beckett for his theater collection, Fragments. Brook’s pared-down style is the perfect complement to Beckett’s lean examinations of the absurdity of life. The works, Rough for Theatre I, Rockaby, Act Without Words II, Neither, and Come and Go, combine “cruelty, laughter, and unexpected tenderness” (The Daily Telegraph).